Dish Network and EchoStar: A great relationship

Dishnetwork’s history as one of the country’s top digital satellite TV companies is filled with industry breakthroughs. Dish Network has been working hard for the past decade to bring the best in digital satellite TV to its subscribers. Launched in 1995 by EchoStar Communications Corporation, Dish Network has continually grown, and so has its customer base, which now stands at about 12 million. Adding new channels, more high definition options, and special subscription packages while developing a reputation for the best customer service in the satellite TV business, Dish Network has become the best choice for digital satellite TV. A public company with about 20,000 employees, EchoStar Communications Corporation is based in Englewood, Colorado. The company has been around for 24 years, and its achievements in the satellite industry have been exceptional. Included on the Nasdaq-100 index, EchoStar is now a Fortune 500 company. In addition to starting Dish Network, EchoStar has many significant industry accomplishments to its credit:

EchoStar was the first in the business to provide satellite receivers for under $200 to its customers.

EchoStar made Integrated Receiver Descramblers available for use with C-band satellites before any other satellite company in the country.

EchoStar was the very first satellite TV company to spotlight single-mindedly on the installation of satellite TV service, as well as the first provider to bring local channels to local customers in every state.

Always ahead of the opposition in terms of technology, EchoStar provided satellite receivers equipped with digital video recording capabilities before any other satellite TV company did so.

EchoStar was founded in 1980 by Charlie Ergen, the company’s Chairman and CEO. He started out in the business distributing C-band TV systems. He formed EchoStar with the help of his wife, Candy, and a friend, James DeFranco. In 1987, EchoStar got its Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS) License from the Federal Communications Commission. Forging ahead, EchoStar began offering DBS service in 1995, starting EchoStar 1 and initiating Dish Network.

The following year saw the debut of EchoStar II, which increased Dishnetwork’s capabilities and services. From there, EchoStar added continually to its group of satellites, sending EchoStar III into space in 1997. EchoStar IV went up in 1998, and more satellites followed. Now, EchoStar has nine satellites in orbit. Together, these satellite work to make Dish Network’s more than 250 channels available to subscribers in high quality digital format with super sharp Dolby audio.

No doubt about it, EchoStar and Dish Network are a dynamic pair, continually spear-heading developments and services in the satellite TV industry, providing no charge equipment to subscribers, and creating a customer-friendly atmosphere, with 24-hour technical support by phone. The future looks bright for the Dish Network team, and there’s more excitement to come for Dish Network subscribers. Stay tuned!

Internet Television: Does DISH Network Have the Upper Hand?

Will internet television take consumers by storm? It may not be this year or next year but the transition is coming. I believe DISH Network may already have their foot in the door.

When I was younger, the internet was merely a place for the government and private business networks to communicate with each other. No access was given to the commercial public and the fact was, it was slow. During the 1990’s, dramatic improvements in communications led to the standardization of the internet as we know it today. The internet is now open to the public, it’s faster, more reliable and durable than it’s ever been. In recent years, many television providers started upgrading their systems to fiber-optic networks. This should provide additional support for a more reliable faster internet and in some instances video and phone services as well. Overall, the internet industry is being overhauled. I believe the future of television will be standardized and in one way or another all data will be transmitted over the internet to some degree.

Like the internet, the television industry has evolved over the past few decades. From traditional television programming known as over-the-air that’s distributed right to your television free of charge. To the 1980’s when an alternative was introduced known as the cable company, under this service you paid for cable channels offered by your local cable provider. These companies laid a network around your neighborhood or commercial property. Several years down the road, Satellite Television provider DISH Network and DIRECTV paved the way to offer everyone the ability to have cable channels, this self-reliant satellite system receives signal anywhere in the United States as long as there’s a clear view of the southern sky. Over the past decade satellite television has dominated the competition in terms of overall growth, reliability and customer satisfaction in the paid television service industry.

I see these industries evolving everyday, so what does this mean for the television and internet industry? With the internet and television (video) consumption widening, we can only speculate that the television industry will combine or conform to the internet and form a new video platform for pay TV providers. So, who’s leading the charge towards internet television? I believe, DISH Network will play the largest role with the transition of internet television. It’s been reported that DISH has approached several media companies about paid TV service being delivered over the internet. Opportunities like this may open the door for a more a la carte selection, choosing only the channels you want and leaving behind channels you don’t want. With DISH Network recently buying some wireless spectrum, we expect the company to roll out some type of internet service of its own, that should help support its video streaming business. DISH Network already offers a variety of Internet Television with international programming. DISH Network customers currently have the ability to send their television service out over the internet directly from their High Definition Digital Video Recorder.

DISH Network Satellite TV vs. Cable TV – Which is Best?

DISH Network has been in a heated battle with U.S. cable companies for a number of years to get your business. While Network has been gaining customers most cable companies have been losing their customers to DISH Network. Here’s why …

DISH Network Satellite TV vs. Cable TV Fees

Cable TV fees vary from region to region, but the average monthly cable subscription fee is $39.95. In my neck of the woods the base fee is $37.30 a month for 64 channels, plus $10.95 a month if I were to add some digital channels.

DISH Network’s subscription fees start at $19.99 for 40 channels, and $29.99 for 230 channels including 60 Sirius radio channels. All DISH Network’s programming is in digital format and you don’t have to pay extra for it.

Cable TV fees have increased an average of 22% over the last three years while DISH Network’s fees have remained the same.

DISH Network Satellite TV vs. Cable TV Equipment
When you subscribe to cable TV you are usually given free cable boxes but if you want a DVR (digital video recorder) receiver you’ll have to pay for it.

With DISH Network you get a free satellite TV dish and a four-room receiver system for free, and DISH Network will give you a free DVR receiver or a free HD (high definition) receiver.

DISH Network Satellite TV vs. Cable TV Installation

Cable TV installation fees vary from region to region. Installation in my area costs $39.95 for one room and $9.95 for each additional room.

DISH Network will install an entire four-room satellite TV system free, and when your installer is done he or she will show you how to operate your system.

DISH Network Satellite TV vs. Cable TV Programming

When it comes to programming there’s really no comparison. Even satellite TV rival DIRECTV can’t compete with DISH Network’s 350 channels, which includes 52 music channels, 60 Sirius satellite radio channels, 31 movies channels, 10 sports packages, 21 international channels, and 80 pay-per-view channels.

With cable TV you only get a few channels in digital format whereas all DISH Network programming is in digital format, giving you a much higher-quality picture and a more realistic sound. DISH Network also has the most HD programming.

DISH Network Satellite TV vs. Cable TV Reliability and Customer Service

Cable TV blackouts average 3% to 5% per year, while DISH Network’s average is 1% per year. And DISH Network has ranked higher than any cable company in J.D. Power’s customer satisfaction ratings for the last five years in a row.

In most parts of the country customer service is limited to regular business hours. DISH Network offers toll free and online customer service 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

Bottom Line

It’s really a no brainer. When it comes to which service offers the most channels, the least expensive programming and installation fees, the best picture and sound, the highest reliability, and the best customer service, DISH Network is the clear winner.